AirlockAlpha.com

Your doorway to everything genre

@AirlockalphaNo twitter items loaded at the moment ...

Opinion

‘Torchwood: Children Of Earth’ – Day Four

Team Torchwood is back, and they have stolen a page from the book of Whedon


This review contains spoilers.

We want : ten percent.

The first three parts of this miniseries have focused on the arrival of the 456 and their ability to control the children of earth, featuring the downfall of Torchwood and the dismantling of Earth’s only line of defense.

Much of “Day Four” on the other hand is centered on the global reaction to the 456’s demands and also Torchwood’s return to strength and again revealing themselves to the Government in a fantastic adrenalin surging sequence. Once the politics is out of the way, tension begins to mount as children again begin speaking in unison, demanding a sacrifice in exchange for continued existence for the rest of the world.

Unable to identify an alternative course of action, the world capitulates : and Torchwood springs into action. After three episodes of development, Lois Habiba (Cush Jumbo) proves herself worthy of joining the Torchwood team by becoming spokesperson for the institute. Jumbo herself has so much potential and will make a fine addition to the casting line-up. As she stands up in the Cabinet meeting, announcing she is part of Torchwood’s army, you can’t help but feel a sense of elation at having the good guys finally score one up over those in power.

Throughout the sequence is an almost angelic music that carries a hint of childhood innocence and finality, further underscoring the seriousness of the events perfectly. Every percussion beat pushes the drama that little bit further, building towards the execution of the biggest piece of blackmail in the world’s history.

Queue the trademark “Torchwood” notes and tone shifts dramatically. All desperation is abandoned and replaced by something else entirely – hope.

And that is why the final goodbye for one member of the Torchwood team really hits home; just when you think there is a fighting chance that this crisis may be averted, “Torchwood” pulls a Joss Whedon. And if you thought the cull at the end of last season was moving, this will have you reaching for the kleenex.

What Worked

Lois demanding the be heard in the Cabinet meeting, only to be rebuked by Mr. Rick Yates’s (marking a nice little appearance by Nicholas Briggs) “you and whose army?” leads into the most satisfying moment of the miniseries. Her simple response of “Torchwood” and the reactions to all those in the room is a wave your fist in their air moment if ever there was one.

And, although the 456 themselves prove to be works from Jim Henson, the mutated child from the 1960’s occupying the chamber is ghoulish to say the least. The simplicity of the reveal only enhances the macabre nature of the alien demands for 10 percent of the Earth’s children for some unknown and sinister purpose.

What Didn’t Work

The flashback to 1965 featuring more scenes of Jack’s deal with the devil was ultimately unnecessary and remains completely devoid of feeling. There are no attempts to show sympathy for Jack’s decision, nor were there any signs or remorse than those that brokered the deal. Worst of all, it revealed the true extent of the threat posed by 456 : and it turns out to be the mother of all anticlimaxes.

Ianto turning Jack’s sinister past into a domestic dispute only diminished the resonance still being felt by those actions, making his unforgivable act something far more casual, almost humanizing his decisions.

Giving Credit Where Credit Is Due

“Torchwood: Children Of Earth” stars John Barrowman, Eve Myles and Gareth David-Lloyd. “Day One” was written by John Fay and was directed by Euros Lyn.

Torchwood: Children Of Earth airs this week on BBC One, and then launches on July 20 on BBC America.

This post was created by a person without an author bio.

Could they be a gh...gh...gh...ghost? Rut-ro! Shaggy
COMMENTS ARE DISABLED Should we bring them back? Let us know on Twitter and Facebook

Media and Podcast

Features